Moon Updates For Lunatics

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Moon images at Bottom of Page...MANY MOONS FROM AROUND OUR SOLAR SYSTEM...Dont forget to check out Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite Pages...! Moon Connection dot Com Web Site

CURRENT MOON

SUN/MOON RISE/SET CALCULATOR LANCASTER/PALMDALE, CA.

http://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/usa/lancaster


Large Visitor Globe

 

 

 

"New" COSMOS With Neil DeGrasse Tyson

http://www.cosmosontv.com/

 

Moon Updates For Lunatics  

 

THREE SUPERMOONS IN A ROW: Get ready for moonlight. The next three full moons are perigee "supermoons," as much as 14% closer and 30% brighter than other full moons of the year. The show begins with the full Moon of July 12th. Get the full story and a video from Science@NASA. 

 

Images @ Bottom of Page

THE UNKNOWN MOON INSTITUTE: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/unknownMoon/agenda.html
 

Lunar World Record 2009
The World's Largest Ground-Based Digital Lunar Mosaic
Imaging Team Achieve World Record Image

http://www.lunarworldrecord.com/index.php
http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/public/Lunar.html 

CONSOLIDATED LUNAR ATLAS
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/cla/

Lunar and Planetary Institute
Lunar Science and Exploration

"Ever since the world marveled
at the first step, we've been
diligently contemplating the
second".
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/ 

 

 Lunar Images and Maps:

 http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/lunar_images/

Digitized photographic images of the Moon taken from Earth with telescopes, from spacecraft orbiting the Moon, from astronauts and their equipment on the lunar surface, and by spacecraft flying by the Moon, plus digital images taken by spacecraft exploring the Moon.

 ... 

"Discover The Fun And Easy Way To Explore The Phases Of The Moon — Past And Future!"

http://www.moonconnection.com/moon_phases.phtml

 

 

 
 
Be Sure to Check Out LRO Site
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (Goddard Space Flight Center)
 LRO Science Results

THE UNKNOWN MOON INSTITUTE

Powerpoints and Much More (use address for information)

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/unknownMoon/agenda.html

The Moon: Applications and Technical Value, a presentation by Dr. Paul Spudis
(Note: some of these images are under copyright; please do not publish this without permission from Dr. Spudis).

Video of Dr. Spudis' presentation at ISDC 2011

Moon Basics: Rotation, Revolution, Orbital Characteristics
 
Phases and Eclipses
 
How Can Radar See
Lunar Landforms
 
Radar Image Analysis
 
Using Radar to Search the Darkness:   find this and more information at following address

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/unknownMoon/agenda.html

 

As our nearest neighbor, the moon is a natural laboratory for investigating fundamental questions about the origin and evolution of the Earth and the solar system. With the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), NASA has returned to the moon, enabling new discoveries and bringing the moon back into the public eye.

LRO is a robotic mission that set out to map the moon's surface and, after a year of exploration, was extended with a unique set of science objectives. LRO observations have enabled numerous groundbreaking discoveries, creating a new picture of the moon as a dynamic and complex body. These developments have set up a scientific framework through which to challenge and improve our understanding of processes throughout the solar system.

Cassini Sees Titan Cooking up Smog                           02.04.13

A paper published this week using data from NASA's Cassini mission describes in more detail than ever before how aerosols in the highest part of the atmosphere are kick-started at Saturn's moon Titan. Scientists want to understand aerosol formation at Titan because it could help predict the behavior of smoggy aerosol layers on Earth. 

According to the new paper, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Titan's trademark reddish-brown smog appears to begin with solar radiation on molecules of nitrogen and methane in the ionosphere, which creates a soup of negative and positive ions. Collisions among the organic molecules and the ions help the molecules grow into bigger and more complex aerosols. Lower down in the atmosphere, these aerosols bump into each other and coagulate, and at the same time interact with other, neutral particles. Eventually, they form the heart of the physical processes that rain hydrocarbons on Titan's surface and form lakes, channels and dunes

 

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA has named the site where twin agency spacecraft impacted the moon Monday in honor of the late astronaut Sally K. Ride, who was America's first woman in space and a member of the probes' mission team.

Last Friday, Ebb and Flow, the two spacecraft comprising NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, were commanded to descend into a lower orbit that would result in an impact Monday on a mountain near the moon's north pole. The formation-flying duo hit the lunar surface as planned at 2:28:51 p.m. PST (5:28:51 p.m. EST) and 2:29:21 p.m. PST (5:29:21 p.m. EST) at a speed of 3,760 mph (1.7 kilometers per second). The location of the Sally K. Ride Impact Site is on the southern face of an approximately 1.5-mile-tall (2.5-kilometer) mountain near a crater named Goldschmidt.

PASADENA, Calif. - The lunar twins of NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission have each completed a rocket burn that has sealed their fate. The burns modified the orbit of the formation-flying spacecraft. Over the next three days, this new orbit will carry the twins lower and lower over the moon's surface. On Monday afternoon, Dec. 17, at about 2:28 p.m. PST (5:28 p.m. EST), their moon-skimming will conclude when a portion of the lunar surface - an unnamed mountain near the natural satellite's north pole - rises higher than their orbital altitude. see below

 

NASA Lunar Scientists Develop New Theory on Earth and Moon Formation

10.30.12

New research, funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI), theorizes that our early Earth and moon were both created together in a giant collision of two planetary bodies that were each five times the size of Mars.

This new theory about how Earth’s moon formed is challenging the commonly believed “giant impact hypothesis,” which suggests that Earth's moon formed from a colossal impact of a hypothetical planetary embryo, named Theia, with Earth, early in our Solar System's history.

“Our understanding is constantly being refined with each new discovery. This research illustrates the importance of modeling planetary formation to enhance our scientific understanding of the moon and its place in the solar system,” said NLSI Deputy Director Greg Schmidt.

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/moon_formation.html

 

 

 Beginning Oct. 30, the shuttle will be on display in the science
center's Samuel Oschin Space Shuttle Endeavour Display Pavilion,
embarking on its new mission to commemorate past achievements in
space and educate and inspire future generations of explorers. 

Endeavour completed 25 missions, spent 299 days in orbit, and orbited
Earth 4,671 times while traveling 122,883,151 miles. 

For information about NASA's transfer of space shuttles to museums,
visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/transition 

For more about NASA missions and programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov 

 

 

Moon News 

Update: Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., have received confirmation that the twin GRAIL spacecraft have, as planned, completed their impact into the moon.

Update: The twin spacecraft of NASA’s GRAIL mission have completed their final rocket burns. Their pre-planned lunar impact is expected at about 2:28 p.m. PST (5:28 EST).

Ebb and Flow -- the two twin spacecraft of NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission -- have begun their final rocket burns. They are scheduled to impact the moon at around 2:28 p.m. PST (5:28 EST).

NASA is providing live commentary of the pre-planned lunar surface impacts by GRAIL beginning at 2 p.m. PST (5 p.m. EST) Monday, Dec. 17. The event will be broadcast on NASA Television and streamed on the agency's website. For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv . The coverage will also be streamed live on Ustream at: http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 .  

SOLAR ECLIPSE THIS WEEKEND: On Sunday, May 20th, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun,...Can anyone get some images?...Let me know and I will post them on the site!!.... 

News release: 2012-132 May 10, 2012

NASA Dawn Mission Reveals Secrets of Large Asteroid

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-132&cid=release_2012-132

PASADENA, Calif. – NASA’s Dawn spacecraft has provided researchers with the first orbital analysis of the giant asteroid Vesta, yielding new insights into its creation and kinship with terrestrial planets and Earth’s moon.
 

April 16, 2012

NASA's Twin GRAIL Spacecraft Begin Collecting Lunar Science Data

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/grail/news/grail20120307.html

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft orbiting the moon officially have begun their science collection phase. During the next 84 days, scientists will obtain a high-resolution map of the lunar gravitational field to learn about the moon's internal structure and composition in unprecedented detail. The data also will provide a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed and evolved. 

"The initiation of science data collection is a time when the team lets out a collective sigh of relief because we are finally doing what we came to do," said Maria Zuber, principal investigator for the GRAIL mission at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, "but it is also a time where we have to put the coffee pot on, roll up our sleeves and get to work." 

 

NASA's GRAIL mission has beamed back its first video of the far side of the moon. The imagery was taken on Jan. 19 by the MoonKAM aboard the mission's "Ebb" spacecraft. 

PASADENA, Calif. -- A camera aboard one of NASA's twin Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) lunar spacecraft has returned its first unique view of the far side of the moon. MoonKAM, or Moon Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students, will be used by students nationwide to select lunar images for study. http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/grail/news/grail20120201.html

JPL Wallpaper/Images

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/wallpaper?cid=lec_email.  

  Saturn Moons/Jupitor's Moons

Saturn has a large number of moons, 61 are currently confirmed, 34 of which have names. The precise figure will never be certain as the orbiting chunks of ice in Saturn's rings are all technically moons, and it is difficult to draw a distinction between a large ring particle and a tiny moon.

Saturn's most noteworthy moon is Titan, the only moon in the solar system to have a dense atmosphere. Due to the tidal forces of Saturn, the moons are currently not at the same position as they were when they were first formed.

Space Topics: Saturn
Saturn's Moons and Rings

http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/saturn/moons.html
http://burro.astr.cwru.edu/stu/saturn_moons.html

Jupiter has 64 confirmed moons, giving it the largest retinue of moons with "reasonably secure" orbits of any planet in the Solar System. The most massive of them, the four Galilean moons, were discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei and were the first objects found to orbit a body that was neither Earth nor the Sun. From the end of the 19th century, dozens of much smaller Jovian moons have been discovered and have received the names of lovers, conquests, or daughters of the Roman god Jupiter, or his Greek predecessor, Zeus. The Galilean moons are by far the largest objects in orbit around Jupiter, with the remaining 60 moons and the rings together comprising just 0.003 percent of the total orbiting mass.

Eight of Jupiter's moons are regular satellites, with prograde and nearly circular orbits that are not greatly inclined with respect to Jupiter's equatorial plane. The Galilean satellites are spheroidal in shape, and so would be considered (dwarf) planets if they were in direct orbit about the Sun. The other four regular satellites are much smaller and closer to Jupiter; these serve as sources of the dust that makes up Jupiter's rings.

Jupiter's other 56 moons are irregular satellites, whose prograde and retrograde orbits are much farther from Jupiter and have high inclinations and eccentricities. These moons were probably captured by Jupiter from solar orbits. There are 14 recently discovered irregular satellites that have not yet been named. 

 

Website updated/maintained by K. Walker "KmanSkies "
Site:
http://www.kmanskies.8m.net

Sample Photo 1

Above: The artist's concept above shows the Pluto system from the surface of one of the candidate moons. The other members of the Pluto system are just above the moon's surface. Pluto is the large disk at center, right. Charon, the system's only confirmed moon, is the smaller disk to the right of Pluto. The other candidate moon is the bright dot on Pluto's far left.

Below: Sedna Compaired to Others

Above: Moons of the Solar System scaled to Earth's Moon

Below: Cassini finds a new moon around Saturn: S/2007-S4 "We detected the 60th moon orbiting Saturn using the Cassini spacecraft's powerful wide-angle camera," said Carl Murray, a Cassini imaging team scientist from Queen Mary, University of London. "I was looking at images of the region near the Saturnian moons Methone and Pallene and something caught my eye." The newly discovered moon first appeared as a very faint dot in a series of images Cassini took of the Saturnian ring system on May 30 of this year. After the initial detection, Murray and fellow Cassini imaging scientists played interplanetary detective, searching for clues of the new moon in the voluminous library of Cassini images to date. The Cassini imaging team's legwork paid off. They were able to locate numerous additional detections, spanning from June 2004 to June 2007. "With these new data sets we were able to establish a good orbit for the new moon,” said Murray. "Knowing where the moons are at all times is important to the Cassini mission for several reasons."

Above: Miranda Voyager 2 January 24 1986

Below: Galileo's Image of our Moon December 7, 1992 One of the best natural color images I have seen!

Above: Liquid Methane Lakes abound on Saturn's Moon Titan. January 29,2009 Recent images of Titan from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft affirm the presence of lakes of liquid hydrocarbons by capturing changes in the lakes brought on by rainfall.For several years, Cassini scientists have suspected that dark areas near the north and south poles of Saturn’s largest satellite might be liquid-filled lakes. An analysis published today in the journal Geophysical Research Letters of recent pictures of Titan's south polar region reveals new lake features not seen in images of the same region taken a year earlier. The presence of extensive cloud systems covering the area in the intervening year suggests that the new lakes could be the result of a large rainstorm and that some lakes may thus owe their presence, size and distribution across Titan’s surface to the moon’s weather and changing seasons. The high-resolution cameras of Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) have now surveyed nearly all of Titan’s surface at a global scale. An updated Titan map, being released today by the Cassini Imaging Team, includes the first near-infrared images of the leading hemisphere portion of Titan’s northern "lake district” captured on Aug. 15-16, 2008. (The leading hemisphere of a moon is that which always points in the direction of motion as the moon orbits the planet.) These ISS images complement existing high-resolution data from Cassini’s Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and RADAR instruments. Such observations have documented greater stores of liquid methane in the northern hemisphere than in the southern hemisphere. And, as the northern hemisphere moves toward summer, Cassini scientists predict large convective cloud systems will form there and precipitation greater than that inferred in the south could further fill the northern lakes with hydrocarbons. Some of the north polar lakes are large. If full, Kraken Mare -- at 400,000 square kilometers -- would be almost five times the size of North America’s Lake Superior. All the north polar dark ‘lake’ areas observed by ISS total more than 510,000 square kilometers -- almost 40 percent larger than Earth’s largest “lake,” the Caspian Sea. However, evaporation from these large surface reservoirs is not great enough to replenish the methane lost from the atmosphere by rainfall and by the formation and eventual deposition on the surface of methane-derived haze particles. “A recent study suggested that there's not enough liquid methane on Titan's surface to resupply the atmosphere over long geologic timescales,” said Dr. Elizabeth Turtle, Cassini imaging team associate at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Md., and lead author of today’s publication. “Our new map provides more coverage of Titan's poles, but even if all of the features we see there were filled with liquid methane, there's still not enough to sustain the atmosphere for more than 10 million years.” Combined with previous analyses, the new observations suggest that underground methane reservoirs must exist.

Below: False Color Images and map of our Moon.

Below: Original Caption Released with Image: (see below) Cassini captures the first high-resolution glimpse of the bright trailing hemisphere of Saturn's moon Iapetus. The color seen in this view represents an expansion of the wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum visible to human eyes. The intense reddish-brown hue of the dark material is far less pronounced in true color images. The use of enhanced color makes the reddish character of the dark material more visible than it would be to the naked eye. This mosaic consists of 60 images covering 15 footprints across the surface of Iapetus. The view is an orthographic projection centered on 10.8 degrees south latitude, 246.5 degrees west longitude and has a resolution of 426 meters (0.26 miles) per pixel. An orthographic view is most like the view seen by a distant observer looking through a telescope. At each footprint, a full resolution clear filter image was combined with half-resolution images taken with infrared, green and ultraviolet spectral filters (centered at 752, 568 and 338 nanometers, respectively) to create this full-resolution false color mosaic. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Image Addition Date: 2007-10-09

Note: The use of False Color Images lets Scientist see Different Minerals on the Surface.

Below: Earth's Moon "Clavius Crater

Below: Jupitor and one of it's many Moons Ganymede April 09, 2007

Below: Hello Earth!

Below: Updated 03/12/2010 Bursting at the Seams, Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice out from many locations along the famed 'tiger stripes' near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The tiger stripes are fissures that spray icy particles, water vapor and organic compounds. This mosaic was created from two high-resolution images that were captured by the narrow-angle camera when NASA's Cassini spacecraft flew past Enceladus and through the jets on Nov. 21, 2009. Imaging the jets over time will allow Cassini scientists to study the consistency of their activity. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute. Click Image.

Below: Saturn Moons and Rings

Below: Apollo Landing Sites

Below: The Largest Moon and Smallest Planet

Below: Earth's Moon Geo Image

Below: LOLA data give us three complementary views of the near side of the moon: the topography (left) along with new maps of the surface slope values (middle) and the roughness of the topography (right). All three views are centered on the relatively young impact crater Tycho, with the Orientale basin on the left side.

BELOW: On the left, Saturn's moon Enceladus is backlit by the sun, showing the fountain-like sources of the fine spray of material that towers over the south polar region. On the right, is a composite image of Titan. Kind of looks like Earth doesn't it? Image credit: NASA/JPL/SSI and NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

BELOW: South pole of the far side of the moon as seen from the GRAIL mission’s Ebb spacecraft. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech...Click Image for Video.

Below: ISS Crossing The Harvest Moon Of September 2012..Taken by Bill Reyna on September 30, 2012 @ Was at a baseball field at the north end of Crandon Lake, Sussex County, NJ...Equipment: Camera Used: Unavailable Unavailable... Date Taken: 2012:10:01 08:51:30

Below....SPACE STATION TRANSITS THE MOON: Two nights ago, astrophotographers Pete Lawrence and Ian Sharp stood in Sharp's back garden in Ham UK waiting for a spaceship to pass in front of the Moon. See it @ www.spaceweather.com or Spacestation News Page...

ABOVE: The Lunar Far Side: The Side Never Seen from Earth Tidal forces between the moon and the Earth have slowed the moon' rotation so that one side of the moon always faces toward our planet. Though sometimes improperly referred to as the "dark side of the moon," it should correctly be referred to as the "far side of the moon" since it receives just as much sunlight as the side that faces us. The dark side of the moon should refer to whatever hemisphere isn't lit at a given time. Though several spacecraft have imaged the far side of the moon since then, LRO is providing new details about the entire half of the moon that is obscured from Earth. The lunar far side is rougher and has many more craters than the near side, so quite a few of the most fascinating lunar features are located there, including one of the largest known impact craters in the solar system, the South Pole-Aitken Basin. The image highlighted here shows the moon's topography from LRO's LOLA instruments with the highest elevations up above 20,000 feet in red and the lowest areas down below -20,000 feet in blue. Image Credit: NASA/Goddard

ABOVE: The lunar farside as never seen before! LROC WAC orthographic projection centered at 180° longitude, 0° latitude Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University...NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., manages the GRAIL mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The GRAIL mission is part of the Discovery Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built the spacecraft. For more information about GRAIL, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/grail.Information about MoonKAM is available at: https://moonkam.ucsd.edu . JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

ABOVE: PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA has named the site where twin agency spacecraft impacted the moon Monday in honor of the late astronaut Sally K. Ride, who was America's first woman in space and a member of the probes' mission team....

ABOVE:..Highlighting Plumes on Saturn's Moon, At least four distinct plumes of water ice spew out from the south polar region of Saturn's moon Enceladus in this dramatically illuminated image..http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/multimedia/gallery-indexEnceladus.html.