Moon Updates For Lunatics

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Moon images at Bottom of Page...MANY MOONS FROM AROUND OUR SOLAR SYSTEM...Dont forget to check out Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite Pages...! Moon Connection dot Com Web Site

CURRENT MOON

SUN/MOON RISE/SET CALCULATOR LANCASTER/PALMDALE, CA.

http://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/usa/lancaster


Large Visitor Globe

"New" COSMOS With Neil DeGrasse Tyson

http://www.cosmosontv.com/

Moon Updates For Lunatics  

THREE SUPERMOONS IN A ROW: Get ready for moonlight. The next three full moons are perigee "supermoons," as much as 14% closer and 30% brighter than other full moons of the year. The show begins with the full Moon of July 12th. Get the full story and a video from Science@NASA. 

 

Images @ Bottom of Page

THE UNKNOWN MOON INSTITUTE: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/unknownMoon/agenda.html
 

Lunar World Record 2009
The World's Largest Ground-Based Digital Lunar Mosaic
Imaging Team Achieve World Record Image

http://www.lunarworldrecord.com/index.php
http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/public/Lunar.html 

CONSOLIDATED LUNAR ATLAS
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/cla/

Lunar and Planetary Institute
Lunar Science and Exploration

"Ever since the world marveled
at the first step, we've been
diligently contemplating the
second".
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/ 

From the Earth to the Moon

Introduction by

David A. Kring

“From the Earth to the Moon” is a brief, but vivid video and audio recording that

  • Provides an inspirational view of the lunar surface, which humans have not visited since 1972, despite being the best and most accessible place in the solar system to explore the fundamental principles of our origins;
  • Highlights vast portions of the lunar surface that have yet to be explored; and
  • Demonstrates how new images are revealing dramatic details of future landing sites suitable for both robotic and human missions.

The scenes in the video are so dramatic that you may find yourself reaching out to pick up a rock and becoming restless to walk among the lunar peaks.  We encourage you to download the HD version of the video (see link below) to fully marvel at this tour of the lunar surface.

The beautiful lunar landscapes captured in the video include exposures of the lunar crust that will reveal, if sampled by future missions, the earliest processes associated with the formation of the Earth-Moon system, the evolution of the Moon through a period with a planet-wide magma ocean, and a subsequent period of intense bombardment that repeatedly modified the surfaces of the Earth, Moon, and all other inner solar system planets. That late period of heavy impact bombardment may have been triggered by a re-arrangement of outer solar system planets. Thus, the Moon is providing details of our own origins, the origins and evolution of all inner solar system planets, and the origin and evolution of outer solar system planets. Moreover, that period of bombardment immediately precedes the earliest isotopic evidence of life on Earth and, thus, may have been involved in the origin and early evolution of life on Earth. Previous missions explored only a tiny portion of the Moon. And current exploration of space from the International Space Station has left us trapped in low Earth orbit. To further understand the planet-altering processes described above and to further develop the technical capabilities needed to explore space, we need to return to the lunar surface. Let’s Never Stop Exploring.

“From the Earth to the Moon” is produced from an integrated set of lunar images and topographical measurements.  The video is not an animation sequence or artistic rendering of the Moon.  Most of the images and topographical data were obtained by the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), in particular, the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) and Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) teams, and rendered by ourselves, Robert Kooima at Louisiana State University, and the Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio.

Options for download

Downloads can be streamed by clicking on the options below.  For best viewing, however, you may want to right click, save the link to your own computer, and then play the file from your computer

Quicktime (HD 1080p)
Windows Media (HD 720p)
iPhone 3gs/iPod video
iPhone 4/iPad

Additional details about the scenes in “From the Earth to the Moon”

The video provides views of (i) the lunar nearside, (ii) a flyover of the heavily cratered lunar highlands, (iii) Oceanus Procellarum, (iv) a zoomed-in perspective of Aristarchus crater, (v) a flight down Vallis Schröteri, (vi) an oblique perspective of Aristarchus crater, (vii) crater walls within Aristarchus, (viii) a pull away perspective of Aristarchus crater, (ix) a zoomed-in rotating view of Tycho crater, (x) flybys of five central peak features within Tycho crater, (xi) a pull away perspective of Tycho crater with distinct panels of images to illustrate a variety of spatial resolutions and albedo, (xii) a rotating view of Tycho crater from a position slightly above its rim, (xiii) a pull away perspective of Tycho crater, (xiv) rotating perspective of Orientale basin, (xv) rotating and pull away perspective from Orientale basin, (xvi) dawn rising over Tsiolkovsky crater, and (xvii) Earth rising over the lunar surface.

 Lunar Images and Maps:

 http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lunar/lunar_images/

Digitized photographic images of the Moon taken from Earth with telescopes, from spacecraft orbiting the Moon, from astronauts and their equipment on the lunar surface, and by spacecraft flying by the Moon, plus digital images taken by spacecraft exploring the Moon.

Attention -- Fishermen, hunters, gardeners, hikers, photographers,
teachers, researchers, psychologists, New Age enthusiasts,
paranormal investigators, astrologers, astronomers, dieters (and more) ... 

"Discover The Fun And Easy Way To Explore The Phases Of The Moon — Past And Future!"

http://www.moonconnection.com/moon_phases.phtml
 

Tools

Topics

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Night Photography: Photographing The Moon In The Landscape

Photographers have been trying to utilize the light of the moon in their landscape photography ever since the photographic process was invented. It was not until World War II, however, that technology had improved enough to make night photography possible.

Today, despite technological advances, knowing the phase of the moon during a nighttime photography shoot is important as it will affect everything from the type of equipment that you'll need to the actual composition of your photos.

When embarking on a night photography trip, there are standard types of equipment that you will need to take with you.
  • A 35mm camera that will allow you to manually set very long exposure times is a must
  • A good, sturdy tripod is mandatory
  • A cable release
  • A good carrying case or a vest with a lot of pockets for your equipment
  • Extra batteries for your camera
  • Many rolls of slow or medium film (60 or 100 ISA—NEVER use 400 ISA even if it’s what happens to be in your camera. Your photos will turn out much too grainy to be useful).
  • Lenses with which you are already comfortable
  • A stopwatch rather than a wristwatch to record exposure lengths is preferable. Stopwatches are more accurate and will give you more reliable information for future moon photography shoots.
  • A notebook and several pens for recording exposure times and other important information
  • A flashlight so that you can easily record your information
Remember that if this is your first attempt at night photography by moonlight, you will largely spend your time experimenting. The resulting photographs and your records will help you plan your next venture more effectively.

The best times for landscape photography without additional light sources, or looking at it in a different manner, away from city lights, is either when the moon is full, the two days before the full moon and the two days after the full moon. Any clouds in the sky will also affect the amount of light available for your night photography, just as they would if you were shooting during the day.

You will have to experiment with your exposure times as so many elements will affect the outcome. The degree of available moonlight; any other light sources; clouds; rain; light reflective surfaces; each of them can make a huge difference to the amount of exposure time needed.

In general, during night photography, one can say that on a night of full moon, with optimum conditions, 8 seconds at f/8 using ISO 100 film will be about right. If there’s a crescent moon and conditions are also optimal, you’ll need as much as 10 hours on one shot! So you see, experimentation while photographing the moon is really the only way to go.

Repeat your shots with different exposure lengths so that you can get a feel for what your camera will do for you.

A very nice composition for a moonscape might include the moon with beams bouncing off of a river, stream or creek.

As the moon moves through its different phases, you can still enjoy landscape photography at night although you may have to bring some "extras" and move locations.

Different moonscape compositions to experiment with during your moonlight photography shoot include:
  • A waxing crescent, or a small portion of the moon, hanging in the sky over sparkling city lights.
  • Bring a flash or a flash unit to your moon photography shoot in order to illuminate an abandoned house, use colored gels to get different color effects and have a muted last quarter moon lurking in the background.
  • As the moon goes from full to new, you can play with light effects from the stars or allow car lights to streak through your composition.
When photographing the moon, be sure to record not only the length of time that you exposed your film, but also general weather conditions and what phase the moon was in. This will help you to produce better photos in the future.

Night photography becomes easier when you're able to plan properly so knowing how much natural light is likely to be available will help you pick the right time to go out and what kind of equipment to take.

Nighttime landscape photography is a creative, rewarding challenge that every keen photographer should try.

About the Author

David Rose is a nature photographer and the creator of QuickPhase Pro, a popular
moon phase calendar software program. Visit http://www.moonconnection.com/quickphase/ now to discover the fun and easy way to view the phases of the moon -- past, present and future. Note: This article may be reprinted on your website or in your ezine as long as this resource box is included. Links must stay active if this article is published in HTML format.
 
NASA Space Assets Detect Ocean inside Saturn Moon  
Gravity measurements by NASA's Cassini spacecraft and Deep Space Network suggest that Saturn's moon Enceladus, which has jets of water vapor and ice gushing from its south pole, also harbors a large interior ocean beneath an ice shell, as this illustration depicts.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Cassini spacecraft and Deep Space Network have uncovered evidence Saturn's moon Enceladus harbors a large underground ocean of liquid water, furthering scientific interest in the moon as a potential home to extraterrestrial microbes.

Researchers theorized the presence of an interior reservoir of water in 2005 when Cassini discovered water vapor and ice spewing from vents near the moon's south pole. The new data provide the first geophysical measurements of the internal structure of Enceladus, consistent with the existence of a hidden ocean inside the moon. Findings from the gravity measurements are in the Friday April 4 edition of the journal Science.

"The way we deduce gravity variations is a concept in physics called the Doppler Effect, the same principle used with a speed-measuring radar gun," said Sami Asmar of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., a coauthor of the paper. "As the spacecraft flies by Enceladus, its velocity is perturbed by an amount that depends on variations in the gravity field that we're trying to measure. We see the change in velocity as a change in radio frequency, received at our ground stations here all the way across the solar system." 

A NEW MOON NAMED 'PEGGY':
NASA's Cassini spacecraft has photographed a small icy object forming
at the edge of Saturn's rings. Informally named "Peggy," it may be a new moon caught in the act
of genesis. Get the full story from Science@NASA.
 

TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE:
Earlier today, April 15th, all of the sunrises and sunsets on Earth
together and painted the Moon red. In other words, there was a total lunar eclipse.

March 27, 2014:  For people in the United States, an extraordinary series of lunar eclipses is about to begin.

The action starts on April 15th when the full Moon passes through the amber shadow of Earth, producing a midnight eclipse visible across North America. So begins a lunar eclipse tetrad—a series of 4 consecutive total eclipses occurring at approximately six month intervals.  The total eclipse of April 15, 2014, will be followed by another on Oct. 8, 2014, and another on April 4, 2015, and another on Sept. 28 2015.

"The most unique thing about the 2014-2015 tetrad is that all of them are visible for all or parts of the USA," says longtime NASA eclipse expert Fred Espenak.

Astronomers have found a new dwarf planet far beyond Pluto's orbit, suggesting that this distant realm contains millions of undiscovered objects — including, perhaps, a world larger than Earth.

The newfound celestial body, called 2012 VP113, joins the dwarf planet Sedna as a confirmed resident of a far-flung and largely unexplored region scientists call the "inner Oort Cloud." Further, 2012 VP113 and Sedna may have been pulled into their long, looping orbits by a big planet lurking unseen in these frigid depths.

"These two objects are just the tip of the iceberg," study co-author Chadwick Trujillo, of the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii, told Space.com. "They exist in a part of the solar system that we used to think was pretty devoid of matter. It just goes to show how little we actually know about the solar system." [New Dwarf Planet Photos: Images of 2012 VP113 

Space.com The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). http://www.space.com/21197-moon-crash-meteor-impact-explosion.html

Moon Phase Software Available For Instant Download Over The Internet or on CD

http://www.moonconnection.com/quickphase/#orderbox

• You'll Know The Exact Moon Phase, Position, Moonrise and Moonset Times ... At Any Moment Within Hundreds of Years
• Monthly Moon Phase Calendars
• Accurate Calculations That Make Your Moon-Dependent Activities Successful
• You'll Save Time and Money
• No Setup Required To View Moon Phases - Automatically Works Anywhere In The World ... Including Southern Hemisphere
• Simple, Easy Setup To Calculate Moon Position
• Runs Immediately -- No Installation Needed
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•FREE "Images of the Moon" e-book
•FREE Moon Wallpaper
•FREE Screensaver  

Be Sure to Check Out LRO Site
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (Goddard Space Flight Center)
 LRO Science Results

THE UNKNOWN MOON INSTITUTE

Powerpoints and Much More (use address for information)

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/unknownMoon/agenda.html

The Moon: Applications and Technical Value, a presentation by Dr. Paul Spudis
(Note: some of these images are under copyright; please do not publish this without permission from Dr. Spudis).

Video of Dr. Spudis' presentation at ISDC 2011

Moon Basics: Rotation, Revolution, Orbital Characteristics
 
Phases and Eclipses
 
How Can Radar See
Lunar Landforms
 
Radar Image Analysis
 
Using Radar to Search the Darkness:   find this and more information at following address

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/unknownMoon/agenda.html

As our nearest neighbor, the moon is a natural laboratory for investigating fundamental questions about the origin and evolution of the Earth and the solar system. With the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), NASA has returned to the moon, enabling new discoveries and bringing the moon back into the public eye.

LRO is a robotic mission that set out to map the moon's surface and, after a year of exploration, was extended with a unique set of science objectives. LRO observations have enabled numerous groundbreaking discoveries, creating a new picture of the moon as a dynamic and complex body. These developments have set up a scientific framework through which to challenge and improve our understanding of processes throughout the solar system.

Cassini Sees Titan Cooking up Smog                           02.04.13

A paper published this week using data from NASA's Cassini mission describes in more detail than ever before how aerosols in the highest part of the atmosphere are kick-started at Saturn's moon Titan. Scientists want to understand aerosol formation at Titan because it could help predict the behavior of smoggy aerosol layers on Earth. 

According to the new paper, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Titan's trademark reddish-brown smog appears to begin with solar radiation on molecules of nitrogen and methane in the ionosphere, which creates a soup of negative and positive ions. Collisions among the organic molecules and the ions help the molecules grow into bigger and more complex aerosols. Lower down in the atmosphere, these aerosols bump into each other and coagulate, and at the same time interact with other, neutral particles. Eventually, they form the heart of the physical processes that rain hydrocarbons on Titan's surface and form lakes, channels and dunes

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA has named the site where twin agency spacecraft impacted the moon Monday in honor of the late astronaut Sally K. Ride, who was America's first woman in space and a member of the probes' mission team.

Last Friday, Ebb and Flow, the two spacecraft comprising NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, were commanded to descend into a lower orbit that would result in an impact Monday on a mountain near the moon's north pole. The formation-flying duo hit the lunar surface as planned at 2:28:51 p.m. PST (5:28:51 p.m. EST) and 2:29:21 p.m. PST (5:29:21 p.m. EST) at a speed of 3,760 mph (1.7 kilometers per second). The location of the Sally K. Ride Impact Site is on the southern face of an approximately 1.5-mile-tall (2.5-kilometer) mountain near a crater named Goldschmidt.

PASADENA, Calif. - The lunar twins of NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission have each completed a rocket burn that has sealed their fate. The burns modified the orbit of the formation-flying spacecraft. Over the next three days, this new orbit will carry the twins lower and lower over the moon's surface. On Monday afternoon, Dec. 17, at about 2:28 p.m. PST (5:28 p.m. EST), their moon-skimming will conclude when a portion of the lunar surface - an unnamed mountain near the natural satellite's north pole - rises higher than their orbital altitude. see below

NASA Lunar Scientists Develop New Theory on Earth and Moon Formation

10.30.12

What do you think? Comment on Blog Page!

New research, funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI), theorizes that our early Earth and moon were both created together in a giant collision of two planetary bodies that were each five times the size of Mars.

This new theory about how Earth’s moon formed is challenging the commonly believed “giant impact hypothesis,” which suggests that Earth's moon formed from a colossal impact of a hypothetical planetary embryo, named Theia, with Earth, early in our Solar System's history.

“Our understanding of the solar system is constantly being refined with each new discovery. This research illustrates the importance of modeling planetary formation to enhance our scientific understanding of the moon and its place in the solar system,” said NLSI Deputy Director Greg Schmidt.

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/moon_formation.html

 

 Beginning Oct. 30, the shuttle will be on display in the science
center's Samuel Oschin Space Shuttle Endeavour Display Pavilion,
embarking on its new mission to commemorate past achievements in
space and educate and inspire future generations of explorers. 

Endeavour completed 25 missions, spent 299 days in orbit, and orbited
Earth 4,671 times while traveling 122,883,151 miles. 

For information about NASA's transfer of space shuttles to museums,
visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/transition 

For more about NASA missions and programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov 

Moon News 

Update: Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., have received confirmation that the twin GRAIL spacecraft have, as planned, completed their impact into the moon.

Update: The twin spacecraft of NASA’s GRAIL mission have completed their final rocket burns. Their pre-planned lunar impact is expected at about 2:28 p.m. PST (5:28 EST).

Ebb and Flow -- the two twin spacecraft of NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission -- have begun their final rocket burns. They are scheduled to impact the moon at around 2:28 p.m. PST (5:28 EST).

NASA is providing live commentary of the pre-planned lunar surface impacts by GRAIL beginning at 2 p.m. PST (5 p.m. EST) Monday, Dec. 17. The event will be broadcast on NASA Television and streamed on the agency's website. For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv . The coverage will also be streamed live on Ustream at: http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 .  

SOLAR ECLIPSE THIS WEEKEND: On Sunday, May 20th, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun,...Can anyone get some images?...Let me know and I will post them on the site!!.... 

News release: 2012-132 May 10, 2012

NASA Dawn Mission Reveals Secrets of Large Asteroid

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-132&cid=release_2012-132

PASADENA, Calif. – NASA’s Dawn spacecraft has provided researchers with the first orbital analysis of the giant asteroid Vesta, yielding new insights into its creation and kinship with terrestrial planets and Earth’s moon.
 

April 16, 2012

NASA's Twin GRAIL Spacecraft Begin Collecting Lunar Science Data

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/grail/news/grail20120307.html

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft orbiting the moon officially have begun their science collection phase. During the next 84 days, scientists will obtain a high-resolution map of the lunar gravitational field to learn about the moon's internal structure and composition in unprecedented detail. The data also will provide a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed and evolved. 

"The initiation of science data collection is a time when the team lets out a collective sigh of relief because we are finally doing what we came to do," said Maria Zuber, principal investigator for the GRAIL mission at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, "but it is also a time where we have to put the coffee pot on, roll up our sleeves and get to work." 

NASA's GRAIL mission has beamed back its first video of the far side of the moon. The imagery was taken on Jan. 19 by the MoonKAM aboard the mission's "Ebb" spacecraft. 

PASADENA, Calif. -- A camera aboard one of NASA's twin Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) lunar spacecraft has returned its first unique view of the far side of the moon. MoonKAM, or Moon Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students, will be used by students nationwide to select lunar images for study. http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/grail/news/grail20120201.html

JPL Wallpaper/Images

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/wallpaper?cid=lec_email.  

  Saturn Moons/Jupitor's Moons

Saturn has a large number of moons, 61 are currently confirmed, 34 of which have names. The precise figure will never be certain as the orbiting chunks of ice in Saturn's rings are all technically moons, and it is difficult to draw a distinction between a large ring particle and a tiny moon.

Saturn's most noteworthy moon is Titan, the only moon in the solar system to have a dense atmosphere. Due to the tidal forces of Saturn, the moons are currently not at the same position as they were when they were first formed.

Space Topics: Saturn
Saturn's Moons and Rings

http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/saturn/moons.html
http://burro.astr.cwru.edu/stu/saturn_moons.html

Jupiter has 64 confirmed moons, giving it the largest retinue of moons with "reasonably secure" orbits of any planet in the Solar System. The most massive of them, the four Galilean moons, were discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei and were the first objects found to orbit a body that was neither Earth nor the Sun. From the end of the 19th century, dozens of much smaller Jovian moons have been discovered and have received the names of lovers, conquests, or daughters of the Roman god Jupiter, or his Greek predecessor, Zeus. The Galilean moons are by far the largest objects in orbit around Jupiter, with the remaining 60 moons and the rings together comprising just 0.003 percent of the total orbiting mass.

Eight of Jupiter's moons are regular satellites, with prograde and nearly circular orbits that are not greatly inclined with respect to Jupiter's equatorial plane. The Galilean satellites are spheroidal in shape, and so would be considered (dwarf) planets if they were in direct orbit about the Sun. The other four regular satellites are much smaller and closer to Jupiter; these serve as sources of the dust that makes up Jupiter's rings.

Jupiter's other 56 moons are irregular satellites, whose prograde and retrograde orbits are much farther from Jupiter and have high inclinations and eccentricities. These moons were probably captured by Jupiter from solar orbits. There are 14 recently discovered irregular satellites that have not yet been named. 

Website updated/owned and maintained daily by K. Walker "KmanSkies "
High Desert Observatory Site
Site:
http://www.kmanskies.8m.net
Contact Email:
kman935@kmanskies.8m.net
Location: Lancaster, Ca. 93534
34.5790°N,-118.1160°W

What do you think? Comment on Blog Page!

Sample Photo 1

Above: The artist's concept above shows the Pluto system from the surface of one of the candidate moons. The other members of the Pluto system are just above the moon's surface. Pluto is the large disk at center, right. Charon, the system's only confirmed moon, is the smaller disk to the right of Pluto. The other candidate moon is the bright dot on Pluto's far left.

Below: Sedna Compaired to Others

Above: Moons of the Solar System scaled to Earth's Moon

Below: Cassini finds a new moon around Saturn: S/2007-S4 "We detected the 60th moon orbiting Saturn using the Cassini spacecraft's powerful wide-angle camera," said Carl Murray, a Cassini imaging team scientist from Queen Mary, University of London. "I was looking at images of the region near the Saturnian moons Methone and Pallene and something caught my eye." The newly discovered moon first appeared as a very faint dot in a series of images Cassini took of the Saturnian ring system on May 30 of this year. After the initial detection, Murray and fellow Cassini imaging scientists played interplanetary detective, searching for clues of the new moon in the voluminous library of Cassini images to date. The Cassini imaging team's legwork paid off. They were able to locate numerous additional detections, spanning from June 2004 to June 2007. "With these new data sets we were able to establish a good orbit for the new moon,” said Murray. "Knowing where the moons are at all times is important to the Cassini mission for several reasons."

Above: Miranda Voyager 2 January 24 1986

Below: Galileo's Image of our Moon December 7, 1992 One of the best natural color images I have seen!

Above: Liquid Methane Lakes abound on Saturn's Moon Titan. January 29,2009 Recent images of Titan from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft affirm the presence of lakes of liquid hydrocarbons by capturing changes in the lakes brought on by rainfall.For several years, Cassini scientists have suspected that dark areas near the north and south poles of Saturn’s largest satellite might be liquid-filled lakes. An analysis published today in the journal Geophysical Research Letters of recent pictures of Titan's south polar region reveals new lake features not seen in images of the same region taken a year earlier. The presence of extensive cloud systems covering the area in the intervening year suggests that the new lakes could be the result of a large rainstorm and that some lakes may thus owe their presence, size and distribution across Titan’s surface to the moon’s weather and changing seasons. The high-resolution cameras of Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) have now surveyed nearly all of Titan’s surface at a global scale. An updated Titan map, being released today by the Cassini Imaging Team, includes the first near-infrared images of the leading hemisphere portion of Titan’s northern "lake district” captured on Aug. 15-16, 2008. (The leading hemisphere of a moon is that which always points in the direction of motion as the moon orbits the planet.) These ISS images complement existing high-resolution data from Cassini’s Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and RADAR instruments. Such observations have documented greater stores of liquid methane in the northern hemisphere than in the southern hemisphere. And, as the northern hemisphere moves toward summer, Cassini scientists predict large convective cloud systems will form there and precipitation greater than that inferred in the south could further fill the northern lakes with hydrocarbons. Some of the north polar lakes are large. If full, Kraken Mare -- at 400,000 square kilometers -- would be almost five times the size of North America’s Lake Superior. All the north polar dark ‘lake’ areas observed by ISS total more than 510,000 square kilometers -- almost 40 percent larger than Earth’s largest “lake,” the Caspian Sea. However, evaporation from these large surface reservoirs is not great enough to replenish the methane lost from the atmosphere by rainfall and by the formation and eventual deposition on the surface of methane-derived haze particles. “A recent study suggested that there's not enough liquid methane on Titan's surface to resupply the atmosphere over long geologic timescales,” said Dr. Elizabeth Turtle, Cassini imaging team associate at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Md., and lead author of today’s publication. “Our new map provides more coverage of Titan's poles, but even if all of the features we see there were filled with liquid methane, there's still not enough to sustain the atmosphere for more than 10 million years.” Combined with previous analyses, the new observations suggest that underground methane reservoirs must exist.

Below: False Color Images and map of our Moon.

Below: Original Caption Released with Image: (see below) Cassini captures the first high-resolution glimpse of the bright trailing hemisphere of Saturn's moon Iapetus. The color seen in this view represents an expansion of the wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum visible to human eyes. The intense reddish-brown hue of the dark material is far less pronounced in true color images. The use of enhanced color makes the reddish character of the dark material more visible than it would be to the naked eye. This mosaic consists of 60 images covering 15 footprints across the surface of Iapetus. The view is an orthographic projection centered on 10.8 degrees south latitude, 246.5 degrees west longitude and has a resolution of 426 meters (0.26 miles) per pixel. An orthographic view is most like the view seen by a distant observer looking through a telescope. At each footprint, a full resolution clear filter image was combined with half-resolution images taken with infrared, green and ultraviolet spectral filters (centered at 752, 568 and 338 nanometers, respectively) to create this full-resolution false color mosaic. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Image Addition Date: 2007-10-09

Note: The use of False Color Images lets Scientist see Different Minerals on the Surface.

Below: Earth's Moon "Clavius Crater

Below: Jupitor and one of it's many Moons Ganymede April 09, 2007

Below: Hello Earth!

Below: Updated 03/12/2010 Bursting at the Seams, Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice out from many locations along the famed 'tiger stripes' near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The tiger stripes are fissures that spray icy particles, water vapor and organic compounds. This mosaic was created from two high-resolution images that were captured by the narrow-angle camera when NASA's Cassini spacecraft flew past Enceladus and through the jets on Nov. 21, 2009. Imaging the jets over time will allow Cassini scientists to study the consistency of their activity. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute. Click Image.

Below: Saturn Moons and Rings

Below: Apollo Landing Sites

Below: The Largest Moon and Smallest Planet

Below: Earth's Moon Geo Image

Below: LOLA data give us three complementary views of the near side of the moon: the topography (left) along with new maps of the surface slope values (middle) and the roughness of the topography (right). All three views are centered on the relatively young impact crater Tycho, with the Orientale basin on the left side.

BELOW: On the left, Saturn's moon Enceladus is backlit by the sun, showing the fountain-like sources of the fine spray of material that towers over the south polar region. On the right, is a composite image of Titan. Kind of looks like Earth doesn't it? Image credit: NASA/JPL/SSI and NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

BELOW: South pole of the far side of the moon as seen from the GRAIL mission’s Ebb spacecraft. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech...Click Image for Video.

Below: ISS Crossing The Harvest Moon Of September 2012..Taken by Bill Reyna on September 30, 2012 @ Was at a baseball field at the north end of Crandon Lake, Sussex County, NJ...Equipment: Camera Used: Unavailable Unavailable... Date Taken: 2012:10:01 08:51:30

Below....SPACE STATION TRANSITS THE MOON: Two nights ago, astrophotographers Pete Lawrence and Ian Sharp stood in Sharp's back garden in Ham UK waiting for a spaceship to pass in front of the Moon. See it @ www.spaceweather.com or Spacestation News Page...

ABOVE: The Lunar Far Side: The Side Never Seen from Earth Tidal forces between the moon and the Earth have slowed the moon' rotation so that one side of the moon always faces toward our planet. Though sometimes improperly referred to as the "dark side of the moon," it should correctly be referred to as the "far side of the moon" since it receives just as much sunlight as the side that faces us. The dark side of the moon should refer to whatever hemisphere isn't lit at a given time. Though several spacecraft have imaged the far side of the moon since then, LRO is providing new details about the entire half of the moon that is obscured from Earth. The lunar far side is rougher and has many more craters than the near side, so quite a few of the most fascinating lunar features are located there, including one of the largest known impact craters in the solar system, the South Pole-Aitken Basin. The image highlighted here shows the moon's topography from LRO's LOLA instruments with the highest elevations up above 20,000 feet in red and the lowest areas down below -20,000 feet in blue. Image Credit: NASA/Goddard

ABOVE: The lunar farside as never seen before! LROC WAC orthographic projection centered at 180° longitude, 0° latitude Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University...NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., manages the GRAIL mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The GRAIL mission is part of the Discovery Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built the spacecraft. For more information about GRAIL, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/grail.Information about MoonKAM is available at: https://moonkam.ucsd.edu . JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

ABOVE: PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA has named the site where twin agency spacecraft impacted the moon Monday in honor of the late astronaut Sally K. Ride, who was America's first woman in space and a member of the probes' mission team....

ABOVE:..Highlighting Plumes on Saturn's Moon, At least four distinct plumes of water ice spew out from the south polar region of Saturn's moon Enceladus in this dramatically illuminated image..http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/multimedia/gallery-indexEnceladus.html.